Food & Agriculture

RSF Makes a Loan to 18 Rabbits

June 10, 2014

RSF is pleased to announce a new loan to 18 Rabbits, a social enterprise that produces organic granola products. RSF provided a line of credit that will help the company bridge funding gaps between production needs and sales.

The story of 18 Rabbits begins in Farmers Branch, Texas in the childhood home of founder, Alison Bailey Vercruysse. Allison used to play in her backyard with her siblings and her rabbit, Blackjack, while her mother made her special granola. One day, Blackjack ran off and returned with a family of 18 rabbits. Alison’s backyard was hopping with an abundance of rabbits, kids, and the delicious smell of her mother’s home made granola. It was that magical, childhood moment and a belief that everyone deserves to enjoy pure, nutritious food made from real ingredients, that inspired Alison to create 18 Rabbits Granola. Using homemade recipes and sourcing from farmers they know by name, 18 Rabbits is committed to using all natural ingredients including only whole grains, coconut, seeds, nuts and fruit, and leaving out fillers, additives, refined sugars, or wheat ingredients. Their products are certified organic and Non-GMO Project Verified.

18 Rabbits sources its ingredients from a pool of high quality organic suppliers. Almonds, dried apricots, butter, cherries, strawberries, walnuts, dates, and figs are sourced from California farmers; cranberries, flax seed, maple syrup, and pecans are sourced elsewhere in the US; and chocolate used is from TCHO made in Italy and Ecuador.

“We are honored to be part of the RSF community, a vast network of people dedicated to making the world a brighter place,” says Vercruysse. “Everything we do at 18 Rabbits is for the love of food. As part of the RSF family, we now can make a broader impact faster.”

In the San Francisco Bay Area, where the company is based, one in four individuals experiences hunger. 18 Rabbits donates 1% of their bars to help fight hunger in their community by working with non-profit partners to get healthy snacks into the hands of kids in need. To date, they have partnered with Second Harvest’s summer kids’ camps, Morning Snack Program through the SF Food Bank, Hanna Center for Boys, and Headstand Yoga for kids.

“In a product category (granola bars) that gives the consumer the perception of being a healthy snack, when in actuality they are packed with refined sugars and other unhealthy ingredients, 18 Rabbits goes to great lengths to be transparent and honest about their products,” says Kate Danaher, RSF Senior Lending Associate. “With 18 Rabbits, what you see is literally what you get. It is a pleasure to work with Alison and other food entrepreneurs that are so dedicated to the integrity and efficacy of their brand.”

photo

About 18 Rabbits

18 Rabbits is a social enterprise that makes organic granola from scratch, using homemade recipes and wholesome real ingredients from farmers they know by name. With a mission of making it possible for everyone to enjoy pure, simple, real food that’s good for you and tastes good, 18 Rabbits is committed to using highest quality ingredients in bringing natural and healthy granola products to the market. http://www.18rabbits.com/

Announcing the 2014 RSF Seed Fund Grantees!

May 29, 2014

by Ellie Lanphier

Every spring, RSF provides small gifts to seed new initiatives that offer innovative solutions in the field of social finance, or address issues in one of our three focus areas. Thank you to all of our individual investors, donors, and staff members who make the RSF Seed Fund possible!

2014 RSF Seed Fund Grantees:

Malama Kaua’i, founded in 2006, focuses on advocating, education, and driving action towards a sustainable Kaua’i. Their core programs include Kaua`i School Garden Network, Community Garden, and Food Forest agroforestry project (which hosts the largest collection of banana species in the state). New programs this year include SNAP/EBT processing at farmers’ markets, Island-wide Organic Gardening Training, Native Hawaiian Charter School Food Program, and the Roots of Kaua`i Green Careers Certificate training. The Seed Fund grant of $2,500 will support the Roots of Kaua`i Green Careers Certificate Program, a free 10-week training program focused on delivering environmental, career development, and soft skills education to Kaua`i at-risk youth, aged 18 to 30, during summer 2014.

Malama Kauai

 

Willamette Farm & Food Coalition, located in Lane County, Oregon, was founded in 2000 to support the development of a secure and sustainable regional food system. The organization promotes locally grown and raised foods, educates consumers, and connects households, businesses, and institutions directly to Lane County farms. The Seed Fund grant of $2,500 will support a website redesign for Eugene Local Foods, a year-round online farmers’ market that makes shopping from local farms convenient for consumers and farmers alike.

Eugene Local Foods

 

Veterans to FarmersVeterans to Farmers (VTF) was started in 2011 by US Marine Corps Veteran Buck Adams to ensure that veterans are able to establish new careers in greenhouse farming, while engaging the residential community in creating a healthier, local food system in Denver, Colorado. The clean, healthy food grown at the Training Center Greenhouse will be sold directly to the community within a 3-mile radius, currently considered a food desert. VTF will accept SNAP benefits and sell a percentage of the food on a sliding scale to ensure access, regardless of income. The $1,500 Seed Fund grant supports outreach to the surrounding Denver community, advertising SNAP benefit use to purchase VTF produce and educating consumers on the environmental and nutritional benefits of buying local.

The produce is grown using aeroponic, vertical growing towers, which use 90% less water and land than traditional agriculture, while growing 10 times the yield. Each 10,000 sq. ft. greenhouse will grow roughly 150,000 pounds of produce each year that will be accessible year-round.

 

REDCOREDCO, the Rosebud Economic Development Corporation, is a non-profit, tribally chartered entity of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) working to improve the lives of the tribe’s 32,000 members by promoting economic development and self-sufficiency on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. REDCO’s recently launched Keya Wakpala Food Sovereignty Project aims to increase tribal access to healthy, fresh, and locally grown food. They received a $2,500 Seed Fund grant to support the establishment of the Keya Wakpala Farmers’ Market, a weekly seasonal farmers’ market where locally grown organic produce will be planted, tended, harvested, and sold by tribal members. The market will open in July 2014 and will operate through the end of September or October; it will accept SNAP benefits from inception.

 

Indian Land Tenure Foundation, based in Little Canada, Minnesota, was formed to address the crisis of reservation land loss. The non-profit supports the return of the buffalo to the lands, culture, diets, and economies of Native American communities through their work with the Tanka Fund and in collaboration with Native American Natural Foods (NANF). NANF created the Tanka Bar, the first nationally distributed food product from an Indigenous community. The Tanka Bar is made from an ancient Native recipe of preserving bison with fruit and is sold in more than 5,000 stores nation-wide. NANF would like to buy all the buffalo meat it needs from Native American buffalo producers, but there aren’t enough Native buffalo ranchers to make this possible. Project goals over the next 10 years include converting one million acres of land to buffalo production, expanding retail markets, and building awareness. The $2,500 Seed Fund grant will support the creation of educational materials on the health, environmental, and economic benefits of buffalo restoration.

Indian Land Tenure Foundation

 

Dane County TimebankDane County Timebank was established in 2005 to build self-sufficiency and interdependence through timebanking. The organization received a $2,500 grant to support the design and communications for Mutual Aid Networks, a new form of cooperative where members collectively manage timebanking, community savings and investment pools (of the dominant currency, plus goods and in-kind resources), and other forms of community sharing and exchange. These are applied to this mission: to create means for everyone to discover and succeed in the work they want to do, supported by their community. Measurable goals include having three Mutual Aid Networks established, incorporated and functioning by end of 2014, with communication tools, training materials, and template agreements for new Mutual Aid Networks to adopt.

 

Green Meadow Waldorf School (GMWS)received a $1,000 Seed Fund grant to support Open Saturdays, a free tutoring program brought by GMWS faculty, staff, parents and students to children in struggling local public schools during the 2014-15 school year. GMWS is located in Chestnut Ridge, New York in the East Ramapo School District where more than 48 percent of students are eligible for free school lunches, and an additional 14 percent are eligible for reduced price meals. The district has faced significant budget deficits in recent years, exceeding $7 million in the 2012-13 school year and resulting in extensive cuts to programming. Last spring, more than 80 district teachers and staff members were laid off, including arts faculty, librarians, and security personnel, and full-day kindergarten has been eliminated district-wide, as has music and art, athletics, and AP and ESL coursework.

Open Saturdays is a way for Green Meadow to reach out to students in this severely under-resourced school district. The principal outcomes are learning improvements by students, but GMWS also hopes that the program will promote a culture of service in their community and support an overarching goal to build bridges between their school and the larger community while providing tangible, meaningful services to their neighbors.

Green Meadow Waldorf School

 

Refugee and Immigrant Fund (RIF) of Queens, New York, was established in 2007 to provide a safe space and opportunities for refugees to rebuild new lives in the United States. RIF has served over 600 refugees through legal and psychosocial assistance. They received a Seed Fund grant of $2,500 to support the growth of the Urban Farm Project through expanded reach and stronger, more comprehensive program development, implementation, and evaluation. The Urban Farm Project began as an additional therapeutic tool to help refugees recover from trauma. While providing a soothing natural environment for psychological recovery, the project also offers several benefits, including job readiness skills development, English language immersion, immigrant integration, and green job training. RIF made the strategic decision to fully focus its resources on the Urban Farm Recovery Project from 2014 on, expanding it from a therapeutic intervention to a comprehensive immigrant integration program using urban agriculture training as a catalyst for integrating newcomers in New York.

Refugee and Immigrant Fund

 

Cooperative FermentationCooperative Fermentation seeks to democratize our food system through the creation of cooperatives in food and farming in Maine and beyond by incubating new co-ops, providing popular education and presentations, producing food, facilitating community meetings, and supporting cooperative transition of existing food and farm businesses. The $2,500 Seed Fund grant will support cooperative consulting, co-op economic development workshops, and research and implementation of new economic models including: barter, sliding scale, alternative currency, hour exchanges, community investment, and multi-stakeholder co-ops. Cooperative Fermentation hopes to reach a variety of people through these programs, while maintaining a focus on younger farmers and food producers in Southern, Central, and Midcoast Maine.

Ellie Lanphier is Program Associate, Philanthropic Services.

Seed Fund Grantee Highlight: Catskill Mountainkeeper

May 15, 2014

by Ellie Lanphier

Catskill Mountainkeeper_landscapeCatskill Mountainkeeper takes on the important and often difficult role of striving to be the best advocate for sustainable growth and resource preservation in the seven-county Catskill region of New York. Through innovative programs and partnerships, Catskill Mountainkeeper has mapped and made available all the trails of Sullivan County, facilitates the region’s movement towards renewable energy, and is growing the next generation of food entrepreneurs. In 2013, Catskill Mountainkeeper received a grant from the RSF Seed Fund to support the pilot launch of the Capital Access Loan Program, designed to help regional farmers expand their businesses and boost the local economy.

The Capital Access Loan Program grew out of two studies commissioned by Mountainkeeper, “A Western Catskill Region Foodshed Research & Analysis,” and “Ground Up,” which demonstrated an immense opportunity within the region to grow the local agricultural economy. Catskill Mountainkeeper:

The report found that agriculture has the lowest start-up infrastructure cost of any land use for economic growth and an average economic multiple of 2.5 (for every dollar earned by a farmer 2.5 dollars are pumped into the regional economy). Coupled with our region’s abundance of accessible clean water, the lowest land costs within 100 miles of New York City and access to the thriving New York metro market, the Catskills is a prime area for agriculture. The New York metro market with its population of over 20 million is currently experiencing a strong trend towards the purchase and consumption of food that is grown within 100 miles. The demand clearly exceeds the supply available and this trend will continue to grow.

Working with business consultants and a well-established bank co-founded by farmers, Catskill Mountainkeeper vets organizations that apply for business expansion loans from $15,000 to $40,000 at low interest rates, and seeks to provide long payback periods and grace periods when needed. (For more details on who qualifies: Capital Access Program Inquiry Form) With every loan comes help with business planning services, an important piece to the model’s efficacy and to the success of the farmer.

Catskill Mountainkeeper_group shot 2

The Seed Fund grant supported this business planning component specifically. “The Seed Fund provides small grants – but this one had a big impact,” says Catskill Mountainkeeper’s Development Director Jennifer Edwards. “Most of the funds we raised for this program are restricted to the capital loan.  It is more difficult to raise funding for the necessary staff and consultant time to implement the program. This grant allowed us to develop a highly conceptualized business plan and we expect to see long-term and far-reaching successful outcomes from this work.”

One lucky applicant to receive funding in the past year is Jonah Shaw of Catskill Food Company, a farm-based, artisanal handcrafted foods enterprise using ingredients farmed almost exclusively in New York. Shaw, who has made a career in many facets of the food industry with a mind for sustainability, creates his sausages from heritage pigs and all processing takes place within the state, featuring seasonal ingredients when available. Catskill Mountainkeeper chose Catskill Food Company as a great example of how a viable local food system can create jobs and meet the desire for local food in the region.

Catskill Mountainkeeper’s work is greatly influenced by their perspective that their region has come to a crossroads, and that what develops now will determine their future for many years to come. They have chosen to promote their natural resources, natural beauty, local talent pool and fortuitous location and hope to lead the region to a sustainable and profitable future.

Catskill Mountainkeeper_group shot

To learn more about the Seed Fund, or to donate, please visit our website.

Ellie Lanphier is Program Associate of Philanthropic Services at RSF Social Finance

RSF Loans Support Workforce Development and Food Security

April 23, 2014

RSF Social Finance (RSF) is pleased to announce new loans to the Bread Project and DC Central Kitchen (DCCK), two innovative non-profits using the food industry to combat unemployment and create economic opportunity.

“These two organizations differ in the size of their operations and the communities that they work with, but they’re both combating similar issues,” says Kate Danaher, Senior Lending Associate at RSF. “It’s a strong testament to the replicability of these types of social enterprises. This type of model can make a big difference in any community struggling with unemployment.”

The-Bread-Project-logoThe Bread Project provides food service job training and job placement for low-income San Francisco Bay Area residents. In the midst of a recession and widespread unemployment in 2000, Susan Phillips and Lucie Buchbinder, specialists in subsidized housing, were approached by their tenants to start a job training program. After doing some research, they discovered that baking was a trade with growing demand and a practical career-path and The Bread Project was formed. Today, The Bread Project runs nine and twelve-week programs that provide training ranging from basic culinary and customer service skills for roles in restaurants and other food retail businesses, to baking and manufacturing practices for roles in food production industries. In the last two years alone, The Bread Project has helped more than 300 individuals in need – with participants receiving over 88,000 hours of training, and graduates earning nearly $2 million in wages.

RSF financing will be used to invest in training programs and curriculum, job placement, kitchen and bakery equipment, and to cover operational expenses such as seasonal payroll and administration.

In Washington DC, DC Central Kitchen has been creating economic opportunity in the food industry for low-income and at-risk communities, while also addressing issues of food-insecurity and food-waste, for 25 years. Since its founding in 1989, DC Central Kitchen has prepared 27 million meals for low-income and at-risk DC residents. Their largest program is the Meal Distribution program which provides 10,000 healthy meals per day to local schools, homeless shelters, and other social service non-profit organizations. All meals are prepared by students and graduates from their Culinary Job Training program for unemployed men and women, many of whom are homeless, have been previously incarcerated, or have struggled with addiction.  In addition, each day DCCK repurposes 3,000 pounds of surplus food products from major food service corporations and unwanted produce from local farms to prepare their meals.

RSF financing will be used to support upgrades to the organization’s fleet of delivery vehicles.

DC Central Kitchen's Culinary Job Training Program

DC Central Kitchen’s Culinary Job Training Program

For years, we’ve tried to push and redefine the boundaries between non-profit social service work and impact-driven social enterprise,” says DCCK CEO Mike Curtin. “RSF’s critical investment in our delivery and food recovery infrastructure will allow us to drive down operational costs and improve our multiple bottom lines of fighting hunger, generating revenue, creating good jobs, and reducing needless waste in our community.”

“Investing in workforce development programs that relate to our food system can be a double win,” says Danaher. “These organizations empower our most marginalized citizens to get back on the path of self-sufficiency with the added benefit of putting healthy food in schools and soup kitchens, recovering food that would otherwise go to a landfill, and supporting farmers.”

 

About The Bread Project

The Bread Project’s mission is to empower individuals with limited resources on their path to self-sufficiency through skills instruction, on-the-job training in their social enterprises and assistance with establishing a career in the food industry. The organization provides clients with rigorous culinary/bakery training program, extensive workplace readiness coaching, on-the-job experience, employer outreach for job placement, and long-term follow-up support. www.breadproject.org

About DC Central Kitchen

DC Central Kitchen is America’s leader in reducing hunger with recycled food, training unemployed adults for culinary careers, serving healthy school meals, and rebuilding urban food systems through social enterprise. Since its founding in 1989, DC Central Kitchen has trained and employed at-risk adults to prepare and deliver over 27 million meals to underserved populations. www.dccentralkitchen.org

RSF Support of Regional Food Systems Bolstered by $750,000 Investment

April 11, 2014

surdnaRSF Social Finance (RSF) is pleased to announce a new $750,000 investment in its Program Related Investing Fund (PRI) from the Surdna Foundation. With these funds, RSF will continue to expand its pioneering financing program for sustainable food businesses.

“We have seen a huge need for debt financing for social enterprises working to connect farmers to institutional buyers and Surdna’s investment enables us to increase our funding to organizations that would otherwise have trouble finding financing,” says Taryn Goodman, Director of Impact Investing at RSF. “RSF is often the first organization willing to provide debt to these organizations due to our ability to understand their unique financing needs.”

Designed for foundations eager to participate in program related investing but without in-house capacity to do so, the RSF PRI Fund offers a streamlined means of recycling program payouts through low-interest loans to fully charitable projects. This Fund enables RSF to provide equipment financing and lines of credit to organizations that don’t fully meet their traditional lending criteria.  The Fund has a minimum $100,000 investment, a five year term, and returns 1%.  The Fund lends out $50,000 to up to 10% of the total fund to any one borrower.

Launched in 2010, the PRI Fund has been a crucial vehicle in RSF’s ability to support the growth of regional, sustainable, and just food systems.  The Fund focuses on building infrastructure to support food businesses with the majority of loans going to organizations working on aggregation, distribution, and processing.  Without this more flexible vehicle, RSF would not be able to support the smaller organizations that have less of a track record, yet play a major role in this space.  Another benefit, RSF is also able to grow with the organization, with the hopes of eventually graduating these loans to their Social Enterprise Lending Program, as was the case with innovative food hub, Common Market Philadelphia.

“Surdna’s mission is to foster sustainable communities,” said Michelle Knapik, director of Surdna’s Sustainable Environments program. “To achieve this,  we are supporting efforts to move toward ‘next generation infrastructure’ by improving transit systems, making buildings more energy efficient, better managing our water systems, and building and rebuilding regional food infrastructure – the last of which aligns with RSF’s PRI Fund. We know that RSF is not just a financial partner in this work, but a deeply dedicated intellectual partner as well.”

In 2013 alone, RSF made PRI loans to four social enterprises and already has inquiries above and beyond that for 2014.  In order to support this growing demand, RSF hopes to raise another $2-5 million in the next year.

Hana Health: Connecting the Dots between Local Food and Healthy Lifestyles

March 25, 2014

From Maui’s main population center of Kahului, drive east along the island’s rugged northeastern coastline for about two hours, crossing over 40 one-lane bridges, and you’ll find the remote town of Hana. Its pristine beaches and traditional village culture make Hana one of Hawaii’s most unspoiled gems. But seclusion sometimes brings challenges: like in the mid-1990s, when Hana’s state-run medical center ran out of money and planned to shut down, leaving the community without access to healthcare.

Concerned community members and legislators met that challenge by successfully bringing Hana Health, a private healthcare provider, to the area in 1997. Since then, this non-profit has been the sole provider of family practice medicine, dental care, preventive healthcare, and urgent and emergent care for the region’s 2,200 residents. Hana Health has also grown to become much more than a healthcare center: it now models and promotes a local, sustainable food system that creates jobs, builds community, and prevents illness.

INSPIRATION

“Hana Health was born out of pure necessity,” notes Hana Health Executive Director Cheryl Vasconcellos, who joined the organization after 13 years with Planned Parenthood Hawaii. “I thought the small community would allow me to be creative and have a big impact on the local economy and community health,” she says.

That has proved to be true. Over the years, the organization has grown to play an even deeper role in the community than its original mission envisioned. Hana Health took on the challenge of improving people’s lives by educating them about the link between good health and eating right—and providing accessible options.

INNOVATION

Vasconcellos realized early on, when funding sources reneged on their commitments, that Hana Health needed a reliable revenue source. “I didn’t want to live and die by the grant,” she says. “We needed to look at our own resources; we needed to be entrepreneurial.”

FILE PHOTOS 1-09 104

The answer: Hana Fresh Farms, which Vasconcellos and the Hana Health board conceived as a way to both serve the mission and earn income. The farm began in 2005 with a one-acre vegetable garden behind Hana Health’s clinic. Today, the venture encompasses a nine-acre organic farm growing more than 100 varieties of organic fruits and vegetables, and a farmer’s market that sells the produce and healthy prepared meals. In addition, Hana Health integrates diet and health education with after-school wellness and physical fitness classes as well as incentive programs such as farmer’s market discount days and farmer’s market gift certificates for patients after preventive health screenings.

When the farm began generating a surplus, Vasconcellos researched potential buyers for organic produce and found a huge demand. They now sell produce to Whole Foods Market, Mana Foods (Hawaii’s largest independent natural food store), local restaurants, and smaller establishments.

Hana Fresh Mixed Cherry  TomatoesPart of the Hana Health vision was to create a Hana Fresh Nutrition Center, which would enable Hana Fresh to sell prepared meals and “value added” products, such as jams and salad dressings, at the farmer’s market. “As demand for prepared meals at the farmer’s market increased, it became glaringly apparent that our 100-square-foot kitchen and outdoor tent were inadequate,” Vasconcellos says.

Hana Health secured funding for the building, site work, and equipment from government grants, but they weren’t enough to complete the project. Enter RSF Social Finance. Ted Levinson, RSF’s director of lending, was on vacation in Hawaii when he came across Hana Fresh products at Whole Foods. After learning about Hana Health’s model and mission, Levinson called Vasconcellos to inquire about their funding needs.

“RSF contacted us exactly when we needed them,” she says. “We had begun construction to avoid losing some of our grants, but didn’t have enough to finish. Financing from the state didn’t come through as expected and local banks wouldn’t provide us with a loan. I don’t know where we would be if RSF hadn’t come to the rescue.”

IMPACT

TAnnual Report 2006-2007he 1300-square-foot Hana Fresh Nutrition Center opened its doors in August 2012. The fully equipped commercial kitchen has allowed the organization to double the number of prepared meals it produces to 54,000 annually. Farm revenue grew by 150 percent from 2009 to 2012. Hana Health now has 40 employees, up from 29 in early 2012.

Hana Fresh Farms and Hana Fresh Nutrition Center are cornerstones of Hana Health’s approach to preventive healthcare and an integral part of the Hana community. Collectively, they promote healthy lifestyle choices, empower individuals to take responsibility for their own well-being, provide employment and training opportunities for residents, increase food security, and contribute to Hana’s overall economic vitality.

Next up: Hana Health is developing a prepared meal program for patients with diabetes and other chronic health conditions that can be improved with dietary changes.

“Given our remote location, we didn’t have organizations we could model ourselves after,” Vasconcellos says. “We had to be innovative and creative. We’d love to serve as a model for other healthcare providers who want to serve their communities by promoting healthy lifestyles and a healthy economy.”

VITALS

Company Name: Hana Health
HQ: Hana, Maui, Hawaii
Impact area: Food & Agriculture
RSF relationship: Social Enterprise Lending Program
Community served: Hana
Employees: 40  
Revenue/budget: $3.2M

Seed Fund Grantee Highlight: Sustainable Economies Law Center

February 25, 2014

by Alex Haber

Building the next economy will take work in many sectors. RSF focuses on work with investors, donors, and entrepreneurs to build the direct, transparent relationships necessary to make economic renewal a reality. But as all these groups move their money and conduct their business with deep values, ossified legal structures will have to adapt and become more flexible to meet the needs of new economic relationships.

Sustainable Economies Law Center 1RSF Seed Fund grantee, Sustainable Economies Law Center (SELC), works precisely at this intersection. SELC provides essential legal tools – education, research, advice, and advocacy – to support a transition to local, resilient economies. It focuses in many areas, including cooperatives, community-owned enterprises, co-housing, urban agriculture, barter, and local currencies.

Last year, SELC received a grant from the Seed Fund to support a new project that helps farmers interested in sustaining and growing their businesses through community-based or crowd-sourced financing methods. These methods allow local, small-scale investors to become financial stakeholders in an enterprise, and allow enterprises to seek capital from friends, family, and community members instead of high net-worth individuals or banks. With RSF’s funding, SELC was able to run an outreach campaign and application process for this new service to assess interest among farmers, and the response was very strong.

South Central Farmers 1One of the most promising candidates was the South Central Farmers’ Cooperative (SCF), a worker-owned farm in California’s Central Valley. The coop grew around South Central Farm, a former fourteen-acre urban farm in South Central Los Angeles. After ten years of cultivating the land and building the community around it, the farmers were evicted in 2004 when the plot was slated for development. This eviction led to significant protests and civil disobedience, as well as an Academy Award nominated documentary, The Garden.

Since then, the South Central Farmers have been cultivating land in the Central Valley, and are currently looking to expand and help start other worker-owned farms. In order to do this, and to avoid the threat of eviction, SCF is looking to form a non-profit organization that could purchase land it could lease to worker-owned agricultural cooperatives, and to finance these land purchases through a public offering, so small investors, potentially from all over the state, could invest in these farms.

South Central Farmers 3

SELC and SCF hope to continue working together on this project as it evolves, and SELC is looking for funding to continue the work and develop a how-to guide for other farms interested in community-based and crowd-sourced funding.

Click here to learn more about how you can get involved with the Seed Fund to support great organizations like Sustainable Economies Law Center.

Alex Haber is Program Manager of Philanthropic Services

Cultivating a Local Food System for Kansas City

January 17, 2014

by Meredith Storton

Kansas City, Kansas, like many urban areas in the United States, has its share of food deserts – low-income neighborhoods devoid of fresh, healthy foods; it also has its share of vacant land. Cultivate Kansas City, a local non-profit, is changing the landscape and engaging the entire community with a healthy, environmentally-sustainable venture: urban farming.

Founded in 2005, Cultivate Kansas City promotes urban farming as a way to build a healthy local food system. Along the way they have become advocates, educators, and activists supporting the production of organic, nutritious produce on the ground and in the policy space. One population that Cultivate is introducing to urban farming is the Kansas City refugee community. Responding to a demand for more community garden space for low-income refugee families, Cultivate partnered with Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas and three refugee organizations to begin the Juniper Gardens Training Farm and the New Roots for Refugees program. Since the program began in 2010, two gardens have been established: the Bhutanese Community Garden and the Somali Bantu Foundation garden. A third will be established in 2014.

cornFor each of these gardens, Cultivate provides the gardeners with training, basic seeds, and supplies. The gardeners receive their training at the Juniper Gardens Training Farm, an eight-acre plot of land adjacent to a public housing site where many of the refugee families live, making the location both accessible and convenient. Once these gardens are fully developed, they will help up to 600 individuals living in poverty grow food for themselves and for sale at farmer’s markets. Further, these gardens allow refugees from Bhutan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere to grow vegetables from their home countries, like blue Burmese pumpkins, African corn, bitter melon, Hmong red cucumber, and more.

RSF was able to provide Cultivate Kansas City with a $3,000 grant through the Seed Fund to support their work establishing the second of these gardens for the Somali Bantu community. The Somali Bantu live in northeastern Kansas City where one grocery store serves a six-mile radius and one-third of the families earn less than $10,000 annually (ISED Solutions, Apr. 2010). In Somalia, the main occupation for Bantu people is farming, so urban farming seems to be an ideal way to help them assimilate into their new home while providing them with access to fresh, healthy produce.

The nearly one-acre plot of land that will be used for this garden was donated by the Somali Bantu Foundation of Kansas, an organization dedicated to the resettlement and integration of Somali Bantu refugees. Upon first glance, the land did not appear ideal for farming; it was heavily sloped and filled with weeds and construction debris. Urban farmers make do with what’s available, though, and Cultivate Kansas City and Somali Bantu Foundation volunteers cleared the land, formed terraces, composted the soil, and planted cover crops. As a result of their efforts, a little over a half-acre is now ready for planting.

Juniper Gardens Training Farm

Juniper Gardens Training Farm

Before the growing season begins, Cultivate Kansas City will help install two cisterns for the garden which will help them plan for water costs ahead of time (instead of connecting to the city water system directly). The plan is to plant the first vegetables in the spring, and the first harvest will be ready for enjoyment and sale at local farmers markets in the summer. To get their new gardeners ready, Cultivate Kansas City will offer workshops covering basic gardening, soil management, and planting for the region and season. They will also work with the gardeners to order seeds and supplies. The garden’s benefits will reach beyond the gardeners to their neighbors and families who will have access to fresh, healthy, culturally-appropriate, and affordable produce.

Cultivate Kansas City is doing some ground-breaking work –they’ve helped start more than 40 farms and have provided thousands of hours of technical assistance to hundreds each year. But there’s still more to be done. As their Executive Director Katherine Kelly said, “there is food to be grown and money to be made and empty lots to be turned into assets rather than blight!” Cultivate Kansas City wants to grow a movement of people who know that they can reclaim the food system and their communities, and who know there is joy and power in the process. It seems they are off to a great start.

We’re now accepting applications for 2014 Seed Fund grantees! Learn more here

Meredith Storton is Client Development Associate at RSF Social Finance

RSF Video: Relationship Matters

January 9, 2014

RSF is transforming the way the world works with money by building relationships within our financial transactions. Our quarterly pricing meetings are a great example of what that process can look like. Each calendar quarter, RSF resets the interest rates for investors and borrowers in the Social Investment Fund community. In keeping with our values of interdependence, trust, and community, we invite our investors and borrowers to take part in a facilitated discussion with RSF staff to help determine what rates will best meet the needs of all stakeholders.

Watch this video, from our September 2013 pricing meeting held in Philadelphia. Learn why relationship matters for borrower – Common Market Philadelphia, and investor – Irma Jennings.

Seed Fund Grantee Highlight: Calypso Farm & Ecology Center

December 5, 2013

CuteSheepby Ellie Lanphier

Congratulations to 2013 Seed Fund grantee Calypso Farm and Ecology Center on a successful first Farmer Training Program!

Seven participants spent May through September at the non-profit, educational farm in Ester, Alaska. They came from all over the globe to experience a full-farm, immersive training, that included field work, business planning, mapping, mechanics, animal husbandry, and fiber arts. Support from the RSF Seed Fund helped to offset living costs for the program’s aspiring young farmers.

You can meet the 2013 Farmer Training Program Participants here. Explore the blog further to get an idea of their experience at Calypso Farm and to learn more about how to apply for the 2014 Farmer Training Program. Best of luck to all the young farmers!

Farmers_jumping

Food & Agriculture

Page 1 of 1112345...10...Last »

Categories

Latest posts

Archives

Blog Roll